John Caboto Academy: Learning about Local Food

Ryan Oxley, Green Animator

The Grade 6 students from the Green Club team at John Caboto took a closer look into the local food system and where their food comes from. Everyone was surprised to learn what grew locally and seasonally from the interactive activities played and that bananas don’t grow in Montreal. As a part of the activities the team made a seasonal eating wheel to help demonstrate what foods are available locally and in season. Students drew, coloured and cut out pictures of fruits and vegetables that are grow in Quebec and then pasted them into the season that they are available. They then built a turning wheel to help make the poster interactive and more visually entertaining. The wheel is displayed at the school for whole school to use and learn from.

After learning what was available to eat in each season, the students dove into learning about our food system. To help identify the local food system, students chose an ingredient from their lunch and mapped out the steps it took to arrive in their lunch box. The students drew from beginning to end their food travelling though processes to get to their plate. The results displayed colourful and detailed systems.

 

About Daycare Matters

With this blog, daycare staff, students and parents will get to see and share the wonderful things that go on in the EMSB daycares, from beading, dance and animation to film making, songwriting and green projects!
This entry was posted in Environmental Consciousness and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to John Caboto Academy: Learning about Local Food

  1. Vincent Giampalma says:

    Here’s a link to an interesting video about a Schoolyard Farm initiative in Oregon that can be replicated here in Montreal: https://vimeo.com/91578576

    They were “founded as means to make school gardens self-sustaining, when time-strapped teachers and dedicated parents are unable to manage a full-time, labor-intensive project in perpetuity. Schoolyard Farms is the only organization in Oregon scaling-up a school garden to a school farm and growing food on a production level so it can be sold to the community, generating revenue to sustain the farm. This model not only sustains the school farm, it generates urban farm jobs, feeds the community, and acts as an outdoor classroom and can be replicated at other schools.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s